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Lifelong Brooks Family Residence

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Brooks Family Home

Google Map image, 2017

The Brooks were the second black family on this short block (cut off from the main traffic), after the Sharplesses. It was a changing neighborhood that would soon see an increasing number of African American residents and eventually African American institutions. At this home, according to biographer George Kent, Gwendolyn gave herself to writing poetry. At age 11, she began keeping notebooks of the poetry she had written. Surviving collections extend from her 13th year to her 25th, with the exception of 1932. It was this residence from which Brooks drew inspiration for A Street in Bronzeville. The original building no longer stands on this site.

The Brooks were the second black family on this short block (cut off from the main traffic), after the Sharplesses. It was a changing neighborhood that would soon see an increasing number of African American residents and eventually African American institutions. At this home, according to biographer George Kent, Gwendolyn gave herself to writing poetry. At age 11, she began keeping notebooks of the poetry she had written. Surviving collections extend from her 13th year to her 25th, with the exception of 1932. It was this residence from which Brooks drew inspiration for A Street in Bronzeville. The original building no longer stands on this site.

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